2017

Community Alliance affirms commitment to best practices in its business operations and governance by joining the ‘Best Practices Partnership’ disseminated by the Nonprofit Association of the Midlands. Process includes a self-assessment of legal compliance and recommended practices in 12 major areas of nonprofit management.

SOAR program expanded with the support of local foundation.

Innovative pilot program developed between United Way of the Midlands, homeless shelters, and Community Alliance, placing trained peer support teams inside emergency shelters to help alleviate frequent crisis situations experienced by individuals with mental health concerns.

Community Alliance is a recipient of the 2017 Silver Award of Distinction, awarded by the Better Business Bureau for significant commitment to ethical business practices.


2016

SAMHSA integrated care demonstration grant ends; Community Alliance hires primary care provider and obtains health clinic license in support of decision to directly provide primary healthcare and sustain these services for clients.

Two Community Alliance programs receive local United Way funding for first time.


2015

SOAR team receives first “Most Inspiring Award” from Metro Area Continuum of Care for the Homeless, recognizing the positive outcomes achieved among the most vulnerable of community’s homeless when utilizing the national, best practice SOAR model.


2014

Community Alliance receives the 2014 ‘Recovery Award’, given by the state’s Director of Behavioral Health Services to an agency that improves behavioral health in Nebraska and furthers individual recovery.

Outpatient psychiatric services expanded to full-time.


2013

The agency initiates outpatient psychiatric and therapy services as part of continued expansion of integrated primary and behavioral health services and to help meet an identified shortage of such services.

Achieved third perfect accreditation review and record fourth out of the past five site surveys conducted since 2001; peer run crisis diversion services, accredited for first time, cited as an exemplary service by national accreditation body.


2012

The agency establishes an innovative peer-run crisis diversion service, offering on-site support for up to 24 hours as well as telephone “warm” line services.

Community Alliance awarded one of 33 federal SAMHSA grants nationwide, and first in the Midwest (Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri) to develop integrated physical and behavioral health service model; partner with OneWorld Community Health Centers to offer primary healthcare on-site at Community Alliance.


2011

SOAR program, a national best-practices model assisting individuals with the complex application process for Social Security disability, integrated within Community Alliance’s array of services.

Community Alliance celebrates the 15th anniversary of ‘Breaking the Silence’ and its 30th anniversary as an organization.


2010

Community Alliance enters into a partnership with the Behavioral Health Education Center of Nebraska (BHECN) to develop a replicable model of inter-professional education and training within a non-hospital, community-based setting.

The organization and all of its programs earns a perfect score in its national accreditation survey for the second time in succession, and the third time in its history. This is virtually unprecedented according to CARF, the national accreditation body, and ranks Community Alliance as one of the top 2% of all organizations surveyed by CARF.


2009

Peer support services are formally added to Community Alliance’s service array with initial focus on integrating this emerging best practice within the organization’s engagement and admissions process.

The organization affirms its commitment to providing quality, affordable housing by renewing long-term commitment within its HUD supported facilities and acquiring and renovating an additional 12-unit apartment building.


2008

Two Community Alliance staff recognized as “Heroes in the Fight” by Eli Lilly and Nebraska Mental Health Association.

Peer Support curriculum developed and offered by Community Alliance and granted college credit status by University of Nebraska, Omaha. At year end, over 40 participants had graduated from the course and began filling peer support positions in behavioral health agencies across the metro area.


2007

Community Alliance staff and client receive national ‘Behavioral Health Provider of the Year’ and ‘Consumer of the Year’ awards for their leadership, innovation and results in the community-wide CIT training effort with local law enforcement.

Community Alliance programs earn second “perfect score” in its national accreditation survey by CARF, the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.


2006

Community Alliance celebrates 25 years of service to individuals and their families with mental illness.

Community Alliance surpasses 200 housing units with the acquisition and renovation of Franklin and Doyal apartment buildings. Intensive Community Services initiated as a new service level and provided on a daily basis for persons residing at designated apartments.

The agency successfully partners with the City of Omaha and Omaha Area Continuum of Care for the Homeless to obtain Nebraska’s first Shelter+ Care Program.

WRAP (Wellness Recovery Action Planning) training provided to consumers as another proven tool in the journey to recovery.

Community Alliance staff and consumers participated in the first ever Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) for Omaha Police and Douglas County Sheriff deputies.

Community Alliance involved in multi-agency system change initiative to move the services system toward the provision of coordinated mental health and substance use services. Provide leadership in the evolution of the Co-Occurring Task Force to help assure a “no wrong door” approach.


2005

Behavioral health reform is implemented with a transition of Vinton House to a residential rehabilitation program and the opening of Ashwood as Community Alliance’s 7th HUD Section 811 project and 9th residential rehabilitation home. The first regional center beds are closed at the second state hospital.

Community Alliance Housing Management Services is formed and assists in implementing the state rental assistance housing voucher program.

Consumer leadership and empowerment expanded through the initiation of CAPS (Community Alliance Peer Support).


2004

Historic behavioral health reform measure passes legislature with unprecedented levels of consumer involvement and self-advocacy; early implementation includes down-sizing of Hastings regional center and expansion of community-based services, including Community Alliance’s residential rehabilitation, day rehabilitation and ACT services.

7th HUD Section 811 project gets underway, with construction of 9 additional housing units scheduled for completion in 2005.

Organization earns full 3-year CARF accreditation of all program areas for 5th consecutive time.


2003

Formalized family education services are initiated with assistance from private funders.

Community Alliance actively involved in the behavioral health reform movement focused on closing 2 of 3 state psychiatric hospitals and expanding community-based services.

Construction begins on addition to Community Alliance’s main program & administrative facility at 4001 Leavenworth, doubling its size.


2002

Construction of 12 additional apartment units, completing the Birchwood development.


2001

Organization achieves ‘perfect score’ on national accreditation survey, a level of excellence achieved by less than 1% of all behavioral health organizations accredited by CARF, the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.

“Building Homes, Rebuilding Lives” capital campaign inaugurated as part of public-private partnership to expand supportive housing within our community.

NorthStar, MorningStar and Birchwood Apartments more than double the supportive, rehabilitative housing options available for those with mental illness.

Community Alliance receives “Provider of the Year”, “Metropolitan Community Development”, and “Building a City of Neighbors” awards.


2000

Construction starts on 12 new apartment units.

Community Alliance takes on leadership role in assisting consumers dislocated by sudden closing of Paxton Manor; two new housing resources established in 90 days to providing housing and services to over 100 men and women.


1999

Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter visits Community Alliance, and is featured speaker at 3rd annual “Breaking the Silence” dinner.

Community Alliance joins others in successfully advocating for State adoption of catastrophic mental health insurance coverage and other legislation to assist individuals with serious mental illness in the return to work.

Community Alliance begins development on new 24-unit apartment complex.


1998

Community Alliance earns national accreditation of all program areas for third successive 3-year period; cited as an “exceptional organization that is providing leadership in the field.”

Renovation completed on new day rehabilitation at 75th & Pacific, consolidating two leased facilities and providing fully physical accessibility.

First Assertive Community Treatment program in Omaha area is initiated; an evidence-based model, the Community Alliance ACT team is one of only three in Nebraska.


1997

Community Alliance awarded State “Housing our Community Award” by Nebraska Affordable Housing Commission.

First community-wide educational event, “Breaking the Silence”, held by Community Alliance with actress Mariette Hartley as guest speaker.

Homeless services expanded through community collaboration in the Omaha Area Continuum of Care for the Homeless.


1996

Construction begins on second peer run home; expands housing options and partnership with City of Omaha.


1995

WorkSource, the largest, most comprehensive approach to returning persons with mental illness to work is initiated with funding from Vocational Rehabilitation.

Community Alliance receives Ike Friedman Community Leadership Award.

Two new group residential homes are constructed to replace leased facilities.

Community Alliance dedicates its new, permanent administrative and program headquarters.

Residential service continuum is expanded with addition of 6-bed, peer run facility constructed with City of Omaha support and financing.


1994

Construction begins on 22 new housing units and new headquarters.

First capital campaign initiated.


1993

Community Alliance assumes operation of two existing group residential homes and a day rehabilitation program from another agency; becomes sole provider of residential rehabilitation services for adults with mental illness in Omaha area.


1992

Community Alliance sets goal and achieves national accreditation of all its programs for the first time prior to it becoming mandated by the State.

Community Alliance sponsors first state-wide conference for psychiatric rehabilitation professionals in the field; continues as annual training event going forward.


1991

Second day rehabilitation center in Omaha opened by Community Alliance.

New residential rehabilitation facility expands housing and service opportunities.


1990

Community Alliance leads successful coalition to obtain changes in Omaha fair housing laws affecting persons with disabilities; State adopts federal fair housing standards.

Our organization and services is cited as one of the “bright spots” in the State in national publication ranking state services for persons recovering from serious mental illness.


1989

Community Alliance constructs and opens 24 new apartment units, offering quality, affordable housing in a first of its kind program in Omaha; funding obtained through HUD competitive housing program.


1988

Opening of first residential rehabilitation facility in collaboration with Sisters of Mercy. This 15-bed residence, in the former Holy Name convent, is only the second such facility in Omaha.

Project: Hire, providing supported employment opportunities in businesses throughout the community, is introduced.


1987

Fremont Day Rehabilitation center opens, expanding services beyond metro Omaha.


1986

In response to need cited by area homeless shelters, Community Alliance applies for and is awarded 1 of 6 national demonstration grants to develop outreach and case management services for those who are homeless and have a mental illness; services initiated on Christmas Eve, 1986.

Community Alliance nominated by Nebraska Psychiatric Society for APA National Achievement Award.


1985

Community Alliance initiates nationally recognized Compeer volunteer program to Nebraska.


1984

Residential support services for persons living in Omaha area boarding homes and private sector apartments introduced by Community Alliance.

Family education and support group formed; later becomes chapter of National Alliance on Mental Illness.


1983

Vocational services initiated.


1982

First psychiatric day rehabilitation center in Nebraska opened by Community Alliance.

Community-based case management services initiated by Community Alliance.


1981

Community Alliance incorporates in Omaha as first organization in Nebraska to focus exclusively on adults with chronic mental illness. This new agency to serve as model in State of Nebraska.

First client served in residential services.


1980

Grassroots coalition forms to address lack of services for persons with serious mental illness.